Essequebo and Demerary Royal Gazette 1811 October 19

 
THE ESSEQUEBO & DEMERARY ROYAL GAZETTE.

Vol. VI.]

[No. 416.

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 19th, 1811.

WANTED,
A Manager and an Overseer, on an Estate in this river, who understand the cultivation of sugar and distillation of rum. A liberal salary will be given to persons of good character, witnessed by their former employers. Apply to the Printer of this Paper. Oct. 18.

BENOODIGD.
EEN Directeur en een Tuyn Baas, op een Plantagie in deeze rivier, kundig zynde in het cultiveeren van suyker, en distilleeren van rum. Een goed salaris zal gegeeven worden aan persoonen van goede characters, en geede getuygenisse van hun voorige dienste. Addresse aan den Drukker deezer Courant. Oct. 18.

ANY persons having claims against Mr. CHARLES TAYLOR, Mahaica, are requested to render their accounts to the undersigned; and all those indebted to him are requested to come forward with payment.
Mahaica, Oct. 19. JOHN ROSS, q. q.

NOTICE.
ALL those who have any demands against the late Mr. K. H. SCHREIBER, or are indebted to the same, are hereby requested to render in their demands, or pay their debts, to the undersigned, on Plantation Doornburg, on Leguan Island; for the benefit of bringing said Estate to a speedy liquidation.
Essequebo, Oct. 13. W. MOOY, q. q.

BEKENDMAAKING.
ALLE geene iets te pretendeeren hebben, van ofte verschuldigd zyn aan nu wylen K. H. SCHREIBER, gelieven kunne pretentien op te geven, om hun verschuldigd te komen voldoen aan den ondergetekenden op de Plantagie Doornburg, op 't Leguan Eyland, ten einde die Boedel tot een spoedige liquidateit te brengen.
Essequebo, Oct. 18. W. MOOY, q. q.

FOR SALE.
Excellent new May BUTTER, in Firkins, received by the Ship Antigua Packet, direct from Cork.
Oct. 19. OWEN KERNAN and Co.

THE Domicilium Citandi et Executandi of the Subscriber is at the House of Miss MELLY ALLEN, on Robb's Stelling.
Oct. 16. EDWARD B. MITCHELL.

THE Domicilium Citandi et Executandi of the Undersigned is at the house of Mr. HENEAGE WILLIAMS, in Bridge Town.
Pl. Hague, Oct. 19. FRANCIS WRIGHT.

PLANTAINS for Sale, at Plantation Vivelaforce. Wallaba, greenhart, and spars, will be taken in payment from wood-cutters.
Oct. 19. C. M. OVERWEG.

JUST imported in the Schooner Sally, Captain Williams, from Glocester [sic], and for sale by the Subscribers,
New fish, in hogsheads and tierces
Superfine flour
Alewives, in barrels, Onions
Red oak shooks.
Oct. 19. SAMUEL MACKAY & Co.

CAUGHT in the garden of the Subscriber, where it had got entangled, a young Fawn, extremely wild, but, from some marks about it, supposed to have escaped from some person. Whoever can prove it their property will have it returned on paying for this advertisement.
Cumingsburgh, Oct. 19. ROBERT PHIPPS.

FOR FREIGHT,
THE Schooner Nancy, to Berbice, Pomeroon, Essequebo, or any part of the coast; by the day or trip. Should a full Freight offer she will go to Berbice in all the ensuing week, apply to
JOHN M'AULAY.
North-Street, Bridge-Town, 19th October.

ALL persons having any demands against the Boedel of JOHN CAVE, deceased, are requested to bring them in, properly attested, for examination, and all those indebted to said Boedel are requested to make payment, so as to enable the Subscriber to make arrangements as soon as possible, at his residenre on the place of the Widow HARFORD, deceased, adjoining Plantation Adventure.
Oct. 18. SAMUEL B. KING, q.q.

THE Subscribers have received by the Ship John, Captain TYRER, from Liverpool, and on sale at their Store, for immediate payment in cash or produce:
[first column]
Irish butter
Mess beef
Ditto pork
Beer and porter
Hams
Potatoes
Tongues
Ling-fish
[second column]
Red and white herrings
Split peas
Pearl barley
Mustard
Sago
Salad oil
Pine and Gloucester cheese
Oats
[end columns]
LIME, BRICKS, and COALS.
Also on hand from former importations:
[first column]
Madeira wine
Cogniac brandy
Old Grenada rum
White-wine vinegar
Loaf sugar
Black pepper
Glauber salts
Best pale bark
Calomel
Blue and green paint
White-lead
Paint oil
Lamp ditto
Black paint
Spirits turpentine
Paint-brushes
Fusees with bayonets
Powder and shot
Scouring ramrods
Carpenters' and Coopers' tools assorted
Boiling-house-lamps
Gin cranks
Buck axes, knives, razors, and looking-glasses
Fish hooks
Sheat-lead [sic]
Hooks and hinges
Sodirons
Teakettles [sic]
Gridirons
Fryingpans
Stock-locks
Chamber door locks
Chest and cupbord [sic] locks
Wine corks
Pump leather
Pump tacks
Hoes, shovels, cutlasses, and pruning knives
Nails assorted
Dutch steelyards
Cambooses
Rudder-irons
Large and small anchors
Bedsteads, with mattrasses, bolsters, pillows, and curtains
Breakfast and dining tables
Mahogany waiters and bottle-sliders
Hard-wood chairs
Swing looking glasses
Patent candlesticks, & shades
Large and small sets books
Memorandum books
Pocket ledgers
Blank books,
Penknives
Desk-knives
Quills, ink-powder
Tin ink-stands
Bills of exchange
Black edged paper
Blue demy ditto
Wrapping ditto
Post ditto
Chaise harness
Saddles
Double and single bridles
Portmanteaus
Heads and reins
Martingales
Chaise and horse whips
Horse brushes
Spare girths, &c.
Russia sheeting
Ditto ravensduck
[second column]
Fine and coarse dowlas
Harn
Brown Holland
Salempores, calicoes
Ginghams, platillas
Madras pullicates
Seersuckers
Cotton hammocks
Musqueto-netting
Bed sheeting
Table-cloths
Irish linen, 3-4, 7-8, & 4-4
Cotton and linen checks
Nun's thread
French and cotton cambric
Assorted cotton shirting
Cotton and linen shirts
Fine Indian jean
York stripe
Royal rib
Fine white quilting
Corderoy
Best buck & doe skin gloves
Green baize
Boat-cloaks
Flannel jackets
Welch Flannel
Black Florentine vests
White Marseilles ditto
Blue pantaloons
Stocking pantaloons
Superfine cloth
Coats and jackets
Canvas, No. 1, 2, 3, and 4
Russia canvas
Patent ditto
Seins and fishing lines
Chalk and deep-sea lines
Sein twine, planting-boxes
Jib hanks, beads
Mast hoops and blocks
Dress-shoes
Strong Planters' ditto
Stout calf shoes
Boots
Ancle-socks
Men's, women's, and children's, stockings
Ladies' black hats, with feathers
Cotton and coffee bagging
Osnaburghs
Negro jackets, wrappers, and blankets
Servants' glazed hats
Negro hats
Negro pipes
Salt, in tierces and barrels
Dish-covers, tea-trays
Fish-kettles, cooks' lanterns
Horn lanterns, funnels
Black jacks, saucepans
Chamber candlesticks
Coffee-pots, coffee-mills, &c.
Blue and green edged soup and plain plates
Wash-hand basons
Fine blue painted boats and saucers
Butter-boats
Brown jugs, &c.
Wine and claret glasses
India shades
Finger-cups
Cruet-stands
Wine decanters, pint and 1/2-pints
Square bottles
[end columns]
Oct. 19. M'INROY, SANDBACH & Co.

RUNAWAY, some time ago, a short stout Negro woman, named Molly, of the Congo nation, well known as a huckstress in town and country. Four dollars reward will be given to any person who may apprehend said Negro, and deliver her to the Subscriber.
Kingston, Oct. 19. KITTY M'INROY.

MARSHAL'S OFFICE.

BY Virtue of an Extract of the minutes of the 14 days' Roll-Court, dated 23d of September last, are herewith by me, the undersigned First Marshal of the Honourable Court of Justice, in name and behalf of H. H. LUHRS, as being appointed Executor, together with J. C. BRANDES, to the Estate of the late J. C. SMIT, deceased,
For the 4th Time ex Superabundati by Edict Summoned!
All known and unknown Creditors of the above-mentioned Estate, to appear before the Hon. Court of Justice, at its Session in the Chief Town of Stabroek, on the 18th of November next, and following days, in order, as yet, to give in and make good their claims; whereas, after the expiration of this Fourth and last Edictal Summons, the non-appearers will be proceeded against according to law.
Rio Demerary, the 18th of October, 1811.
M. SMIT, First Marshal.

PUBLIC VENDUES.

On Friday the 8th of November, [see 18110928EDRG] . . .
[see 18111008EDRG] . . .
Also on the same day and place, by order of GILBERT ROBERTSON and JOHN ROSS, deliberating executors to the will of HUGH MUNRO, deceased, late carpenter at Mahaica, the following articles: Two fine young Negro men, carpenters, named Pitt and Goodluck; a double-barrelled gun, mounted, in a case; a single-barrelled ditto, in a case; a pistol; 2 old watches; a writing desk; a case of mathematical instruments; a deal chest, containing some carpenters's tools; sundry wearing apparel; powder-horn and shot-bag; some odd volumes of books, &c. &c.
September 28th. KINGSTON & McBEAN.

SECRETARY'S OFFICE.
 

This is to inform the
Public, that the following
Persons intend quitting this
Colony;-

Van het Secretary deezer
Colonie word geadverteerd,
dat de volgende Persoonen
van voorneemens zyn van hier
na elders te vertrekken, viz;

 
Mrs. R. Freeman and her Son, in 14 days or 6 weeks, from . . . Oct. 5.
J. F. Hoesberg, in 14 days, from . . . . 7.
P. W. Cuvilje, in do. . . . . . . . . . 7.
M. Howard, with one servant, in do. or 6 weeks. 8.
E. Afanador, in do. . . . . . . 9.
J. Williams, in do. . . . . . . 11.
H. Parson, in do. . . . . . . . 12.
C. Taylor, in do. . . . . . . . 12.
C. Hendrison, in 14 days . . . 13.
ROBERT PHIPPS, Sworn Clerk.

FRESH TEMPER LIME,
Landing from the Antigua Packet, for sale by
Oct. 19. NURSE and TROUGHTON

Not being in possession of matter more important, we this day present our readers with an abridgement of the last Act of the British Parliament relative to the Slave-Trade; a copy of the Resolutions entered into at a late Meeting of the Planters and West India Merchants of Glasgow; and an extract from a pamphlet, published in London, by Jeffery, the seaman; who, it will be recollected, was left on the desolate Rock of Sombrero, by order of Capt. Lake.

Since our last the Antigua Packet, Capt. MARES, has arrived from Liverpool, last from Surinam: but she brings no news.

SLAVE-TRADE.

An Act for rendering more effectual an Act made in the Forty-seventh Year of His Majesty's Reign, intituled, "An Act for the Abolition of the Slave-Trade." (May 14, 1811.)
Subjects or Persons residing in the United Kingdom, or any of the Dominions belonging to His Majesty, carrying on the Slave-Trade, or any way engaged therein, shall be declared Felons - Whereas the two Houses of Parliament did, by the Resolution of the 10th and 24th days of June 1806, severally resolve, That the African Slave-Trade being contrary to the principles of justice, humanity, and sound policy, they would, with all practicable expedition, take effectual measures for the abolition of the same; and whereas, in conformity with the said Resolutions, and for all, and each of the reasons therein stated, the said Trade was, by an Act passed in the 47th year of his present Majesty, declared to be unlawful; and whereas it hath been found that diverse persons, not deterred by the provisions and penalties of the said Act, do still continue to deal and trade in slaves upon the coast of Africa and elsewhere, and to carry them, for sale by sea; and whereas the Commons House of Parliament, by its Resolution of the 15th of June, 1810, did express its indignation at such practices, and did resolve speedily to take into consideration such measures as might tend effectually to prevent such daring violations of the law; and whereas it is fit that such measures should be extended also to the effectual abolition of the Slave-Trade, wheresoever it may be attempted to practice it; be it therefore enacted, by the King's Most Excellent Majesty, by and with the advice and consent of the Lords Spiritual and Temporal, and Commons, in this present Parliament assembled, and by the authority of the same, That if any subject or subjects of His Majesty, or if any person or persons residing or being within this United Kingdom, or in any of the Islands, Colonies, Dominions, Forts, Settlements, Factories, or Territories now or hereafter belonging thereto, or being in his Majesty's occupation or possession, or under the government of the United Company of Merchants trading to the East Indies, shall, from and after the 1st day of June next, by him or themselves, or by his or their factors or agents, or otherwise, howsoever, carry away or remove, or aid or assist in the carrying away or removing, as a slave or slaves, or for the purpose of being sold, transferred, used, or dealt with, as a slave or slaves, any person or persons whatsoever, from any part of Africa, or from any other country, territory, or place whatsoever, either immediately or by transhipment at sea or otherwise, directly or indirectly; or shall import or bring, or aid or assist in the importing or bringing, into any island, colony, country, territory, or place whatsoever, any such person or persons as aforesaid, for the purpose aforesaid; or shall knowingly and wilfully ship, embark, receive, detain, or confine, on board any ship, vessel, or boat, any such person or persons as aforesaid, for the purpose of his, her, or their being so carried away or removed, imported, or brought as aforesaid, or of being sold, transferred, used, or dealt with, as a slave or slaves; or shall knowingly and wilfully use or employ, or permit to be used or employed, or to let or take to freight or on hire, any ship or vessel to be used or employed in carrying away or removing, importing or bringing, or for the purpose of carrying away or removing, importing or bringing, as aforesaid, any such person or persons, as a slave or slaves, or for the purpose of his, her, or their, being sold, transferred, used, or dealt with, as a slave or slaves; or shall fit out, or cause to be fitted out, or shall take the charge or command of, or navigate, or enter and embark on board, any such ship or vessel, as master or captain, mate, supercargo, or surgeon, knowing that such ship or vessel is actually employed, or is the same voyage for which he or they shall so enter and embark on board, intended to be employed in carrying or removing, importing or bringing, as aforesaid, any such person or persons, as or for the purpose of his, her, or their being sold, transferred, used, or dealt with, as a slave or slaves; then, and in every such case, the person or persons so offending, and their counsellors, aiders, and abettors, shall be, and are hereby declared to be, felons, and shall be transported beyond seas, for a term not exceeding fourteen years, or shall be confined and kept to hard labour, for a term not exceeding five years nor less than three years, at the discretion of the Court before whom such offender or offenders shall be tried and convicted.
Punishment of Persons serving on board any Ship, or underwriting any Policy thereon.] - II. Provided always, and be it further enacted, by the authority aforesaid, That if any person or persons shall, from and after the 1st day of May next, enter or navigate, or embark on board, any such ship or vessel used or employed, or meant and intended to be used and employed, as aforesaid, as a petty officer, servant, or seaman, or petty officers, servants, or seamen, knowing that such is or shall be the purpose, or one of the purposes, of the voyage; or if any person or persons shall underwrite, or procure to be underwritten, any policy of Assurance upon any ship or vessel, or goods, or the freight of any ship or vessel employed, or intended to be employed, in any such voyage, knowing that such is or shall be the purpose, or one of the purposes, of the said voyage; he or they, nevertheless, shall not be deemed guilty of a felony within the meaning of this Act, but shall be, and they are hereby declared to be, guilty of a misdemeanour only, and shall be punished by imprisonment for a term not exceeding two years.
Persons not to be deemed Accessories.] - III. And it is hereby further enacted and declared, That such persons shall not be deemed to be, no shall be punished as, accessories to felony; any thing in this present Act to the contrary thereof notwithstanding.
Act not to prevent the removing of Slaves from one British Settlement to another, &c.; nor prevent the transportation to foreign places of slaves that have been convicted of crimes] - IV. Provided always, and be it further enacted, by the authority aforesaid, That nothing in this Act contained shall extend, or be construed to extend, to subject any person or persons to the pains and penalties hereby imposed for exporting, removing, or carrying, from any present or future British island, colony, or settlement, in the West Indies, to any other present or future British island, colony, or settlement, in the West Indies, or from one part of such British Island, colony, or settlement, in the West Indies, to any other part of the same island, colony, or settlement, or for importing or transporting into, or landing in, any such island, colony, or settlement, any slave or slaves, which have been or shall be born within such islands, colonies, or settlements, or any slave or slaves which must have been or may be lawfully imported or brought into the said islands, colonies, or settlements, or for removing or carrying any slave or slaves from one part of any foreign island, colony, or settlement, to another part of the same foreign island, colony, or settlement, or for trans-shipping and assisting at sea any slave or slaves which shall be in any ship or vessel in distress: Provided also, that nothing in this Act contained shall extend to prevent the transportation to any foreign colony or place of any slave or slaves that shall have been convicted, by due course of law, in any present or future British island or colony, of any crime to which the punishment of transportation is or shall be annexed by the law of such island or colony; but in every such case a copy of the judgment or sentence, certified by the Court before which the offender was convicted, shall be transported.
Act not to extend to things done before certain periods.] - V. Provided also, and be it further enacted, That nothing herein-before-contained shall extend, or be construed to extend, to subject any person or persons to the pains and penalties imposed for any thing done or to be done in Africa, west of the Cape of Good Hope, or in the West Indies, or America, to the east of Cape Horn, on or before the 1st day of September next; nor for any thing done or to be done in the East Indies, the island of Madagascar, the ports and places of Africa to the east of the Cape of Good Hope, the islands of Mauritius and Bourbon, and the islands in the East Indian seas, on or before the 1st day of January next; nor for any thing done or to be done in New Holland, the islands in the South Seas, or the coast of America to the west of Cape Horn, on or before the 1st day of My, in the year 1812; nor for any thing done or to be done in the high seas, on board of any ship or vessel which hath or shall have sailed last from any port of Great Britain or Ireland, on or before the 1st day of June next, or from any other port or place in Europe, on or before the 1st day of July next; or from any port or place in Africa, west of the Cape of Good Hope, or the West Indies, or America, to the east of Cape Horn, on or before the 1st day of August next; or from any port or place in the East Indies, Madagascar, the islands of Mauritius and Bourbon, the coast of Africa to the east of the Cape of Good Hope, and the islands in the East Indian Seas, on or before the 1st day of January next; or from any port or place in New Holland, the islands of the South Seas, or the coast of America to the west of Cape Horn, on or before the 1st day of May, in the year 1812.
Offences to be tried according to the ordinary course of Law.] - VI. And be it further enacted and declared, That all offences hereinbefore declared to be felonies or misdemeanours, which shall be committed in Africa, or in any Country, Territory, or Place, other than this United Kingdom, or on the high seas, or in any port, sea, creek, or place, where the Admiral has jurisdiction, shall and may be inquired of either according to the ordinary course of law, and the provisions of an Act passed in the 28th year of the reign of King Henry the Eighth, intituled, "An Act for Pirates," or according to the provisions of an Act passed in the thirty-third year of the reign of King Henry the Eighth, intituled, "An Act to proceed by commission of Oyer and Terminer, against such persons as shall confess treason and felony, without remanding the same to be tried in the shire where the offence was committed," so far as the same Act is now unrepealed; or according to the provisions of an Act passed in the eleventh and twelfth years of the reign of his Majesty King William the Third, intituled, "An Act passed for the more effectual suppression of piracy"
Act not to repeal former Act in respect to forfeitures.] - VII. Provided always, and it is hereby further enacted and declared, That nothing herein contained shall be construed to repeal, annul, or alter the said Act made, in the forty-sixth year of his present Majesty, or an Act made in the forty-sixth year of his present Majesty, for preventing the importation of slaves by any of His Majesty's subjects into any Islands, Colonies, Plantations, or Territories belonging to any foreign State or Power, in respect of any forfeitures of ships or vessels, cargoes, goods, or effects, thereby respectively imposed for any offence against the said Acts, or either of them, or the remedies thereby given for the recovery thereof, or in respect of any pecuniary penalties thereby imposed; but that the said Acts shall, in all other respects, be deemed and taken to be in full force, except so far as the said Act of the forty-sixth year of His present Majesty is altered, or extended by the said Act of the forty-seventh year of His said Majesty.
Governors and Commanders in Chief, and persons authorised by them, may seize vessels and other forfeitures.] - And whereas it is in and by the said Acts respectively enacted, that all ships and vessels, slaves and natives of Africa, carried, conveyed, or dealt with as slaves, and all other goods and effects that shall or may become forfeited for any offence committed against the said Acts respectively, shall and may be seized by any Officer of His Majesty's Customs or Excise, or by the Commanders or Officers of any of His Majesty's ships or vessels of war: And whereas ships and vessels, slaves, goods, and effects, liable to seizure and forfeiture under the said Acts, for offences committed on the coast of Africa, may be safely navigated, carried or kept, upon or near to the said coast, or in the ports, havens, or rivers, thereof, in contempt of said Acts, by reason of the want of Officers of the Customs or Excise, or of His Majesty's ships or vessels of war stationed on the said coast, or on such parts thereof as may be visited by such offenders; be it therefor further enacted by the authority aforesaid, That it shall and may be lawful for all Governors or persons having the chief command, Civil or Military, of any of the Colonies, Settlements, Forts or Factories, belonging to His Majesty, or to the African Company in Africa, or any African Island, and for all persons deputed and authorised by any such Governor or Commander in Chief, to seize and prosecute all ships and vessels, slaves or natives of Africa, carried, conveyed, or dealt with as slaves, and all goods and effects whatsoever that shall or may become forfeited for any offence committed against the said Acts of Parliament, or either of them, and which shall be found upon or near to the said coast, or in any port, haven, or river thereof, or within the limits of any of the said Colonies, Settlements, Ports, or Factories, which Governor or Commander in Chief, and all persons by them so deputed and authorised, shall, in making and prosecuting any such seizures, have the benefit of all the provisions made by the said Acts of Parliament, or by an Act of the fourth year of His present Majesty therein recited, or by any other Act of Parliament for the protection of Officers seizing and prosecuting for any offence against the said last-mentioned Act, or any other Act of Parliament relating to the Trade and Revenues of the British Colonies or Plantations in America.
Persons sailing in vessels giving information of offences committed not to be liable to punishment.] - IX. Provided also, and be it further enacted by the Authority aforesaid. That if any person or persons, sailing or being in the capacity of a petty Officer, or petty Officers' servant or servants, seaman or seamen, on board of any ship or vessel fitted out for or engaged in the unlawfully carrying, removing, trading, or dealing in Slaves, shall, within three months after the arrival of the said vessel at any port belonging to His Majesty, give information on oath, before any competent Magistrate, against any Owner or part Owner, or any Captain, Mate, Surgeon, or Supercargo of such ship or vessel, who shall have committed any offence against this Act, and shall give evidence on oath against such Owner or part Owner, Captain, Mate, Surgeon, and Supercargo, before any Magistrate or Court before whom such offender may be tried; or if such person or persons so failing as aforesaid, in the capacity of a petty Officer or petty Officers, mariner or mariners, servant or servants, shall, within three months after his or their arrival at any port or place not within His Majesty's dominions, give information to any of His Majesty's Ambassadors, Ministers Plenipotentiary, Envoys, Charges d' Affaires, Consuls, Residents, or other Agents, so that any person or persons owning such ship or vessel, or navigating or taking charge of the same, as Captain, Mate, Surgeon, or Supercargo, may be apprehended, such person or persons so giving such information and evidence, shall not be liable to any of the pains or penalties of this Act, or any fine or other punishment under the said Act, of the 46th and 47th years of His present Majesty, or either of them; but shall be wholly discharged therefrom, and His Majesty's Ambassadors, Ministers Plenipotentiary, Envoys, Charges d' Affaires, Consuls, Residents, or other Agents, are hereby required to receive any such information as aforesaid, and to transmit the particulars thereof, without delay, to one of His Majesty's principal Secretaries of State, and to transmit copies of the same to the Commanders of His Majesty's ships or vessels then being in the said port or place.

PUBLIC MEETING.

At a General Meeting of the Planters and West India Merchants of Glasgow, held in the Tontine Tavern, on the 29th of May, 1811.

CHARLES STIRLING, ESQ. IN THE CHAIR,

It was unanimously resolved.
1. That the West India colonies are of the highest importance to the wealth, commerce, and prosperity of this country; as their produce forms fully one-third of our whole imports; as their supplies amount to nearly one-fourth of our exports; as the shipping employed in the trade affords the best nursery for seamen; and as the duties paid to Government constitute a principal branch of the revenue.
2. That it is, therefore, our best policy, as well as our incumbent duty, to nourish and protect our fellow-subjects in the colonies, from whom we derive such important advantages, and whom we place under the restriction of sending their produce to this country in a raw state, and in British bottoms.
3. That it was proved before the Privy Council, in 1783, that, in the cultivation of estates in the West Indies, there was a British capital embarked of 86,556,000, which, with subsequent advances, must now amount to nearly double that sum; and it was reported by the Committee of the House of Commons, in 1807, "that the profits have gradually diminished to 2 1/2 to 1 1/2 per cent. till, at the present moment, there is no return of interest whatever."
4. That, by the Report of the Committee, in 1807, the import of sugars into Britain was 3,651,686 cwt. of which the export amounted to 1,120,534 cwt.; since which time, the import, from the capture of the foreign islands, has been largely augmented; while the export, owing to the continental restrictions, has almost wholly ceased; so that, unless a remedy be provided, the surplus above the home-consumpt, which is nearly a third of the whole produce, must be thrown on the market, useless and unsaleable.
5. That it appears, by the official returns to Parliament, that, in the year 1810, the real value of foreign grain imported into Great Britain amount to 7,077,865; which would have been considerably more had not sugar, at the time, been substituted for corn in the distilleries.
6. That the real value of grain annually consumed in the distilleries was estimated, in the Reports of the Committee, at 470,000 quarters, or about 950,000.
7. That the corresponding quantity of sugars which may have been used in the distilleries, during the suspension of grain, may be computed at 770,000 cwt. or about 60,000 hhds. of 13 cwt. each.
8. That, under such circumstances, no policy could be more obvious, no duty could be more imperious, than to husband our own resources; to save the food of the poor; to counteract the anticommercial system of the Continent; to render this country, as far as possible, independent of foreign relations, to consume at home the surplus produce of our colonists, and to give them, by the use of their sugar in the distilleries, that boon which we bestow on the enemy by the importation of their grain: - thus cherishing our best friends in place of encouraging our inveterate foes, strengthening their sinews for the prosecution of the war, and giving them our bullion, at the very time that they refuse to receive a single article of our commerce or manufactures. To the agricultural interest of the country (so justly dear to us all) the measure would have been beneficial, in place of being injurious; for not only is the value of land intimately connected with the progress of commercial prosperity, but the supply of grain is increased, by the importation from the Continent, seven times more than its consumption would have been diminished by its exclusion from the distilleries.
9. That the Equalization Bill, lately lost in the House of Lords, although a benefit far short of what the colonists, under existing circumstances, were entitled to expect, was certainly calculated to allay the fears, and to soothe the prejudices, of the opponents to the measure; and, if the comparative rates at which barley and sugar were admitted by this Bill, into competition were deemed unequal, any such disparity might easily have been corrected, in place of altogether rejecting the plan.
10. That, as a considerable proportion of the sugars imported into this country is of a middling and inferior quality, they can be applied to no other use, during the present state of trade, than distillation.
11. That, in addition to the miserable prospects arising from the sugar market, and to consummate the distress of the West India community, the articles of coffee and pimento, owing to the same continental restrictions, have become absolute drugs, accumulating in immense quantities, and scarcely worth more than freight and charges.
12. That we have seen, with sorrow and regret, a spirit of hostility arising against the colonial interests; and if the ruin which now seems to impend over them, by the prosecution of the present system; if the loss of the immense capital which has been invested, on the good faith of this country; if the consequent distress which must be felt by a numerous body of merchants - if these be not object sufficient to awaken attention, and engage support, it is to be hoped that the other effects, which must inevitably ensue at home, will be duly weighed, before it be too late; as the fate of the colonies may involve, in their downfal [sic], the commercial, manufacturing, maritime, and financial, interests of the kingdom.
Resolved,
That a Copy of these Resolutions be communicated to the whole West India bodies, and to all commercial and manufacturing towns of importance in Great Britain; and that a deputation be appointed immediately to proceed to London, where delegates from other quarters shall be requested to convene, and to impress in the most earnest and respectful manner, on his Majesty's Government the great importance of this case, and the necessity of immediate relief.
Signed, in name and by appointment of the Meeting,
CHARLES STIRLING, Chairman.
C. D. DONALD, Secretary.

JEFFERY THE SEAMAN.

Authentic account of the sufferings of Robert Jeffery, the seaman, who was put on the desolate Rock of Sombrero; extracted from a pamphlet published by himself, in London, intituled, "A Narrative of his Life and Sufferings."
"One day, being in want of water, not having our full allowance, I took some spruce-beer from the cask which belonged to the midshipmen. This cask lay between decks. I took about two quarts to drink. The Captain, being informed of this by one of the crew, ordered me to be called up the next morning, (it being Sunday). I was then ordered back, after being asked by I took the spruce-beer? I informed the Captain that I took it for want of sufficient water; for, being very hot, I was almost dying with thirst, and had been working very hard all day. No further notice was taken until the Sunday following. The rock of Sombrero being near, I was called upon deck. It was just dark. Captain lake asked me if I knew he meant to put me on yonder rock? With tears in my eyes, and with the greatest humility, I replied, 'I hope not, Sir.' But he ordered me instantly to fetch my clothes. When I brought them on deck, the Captain asked me, 'What I had got there?' I replied, 'My clothes, Sir, which you ordered me to fetch.' The Captain replied, 'Drop them, Sir, and quit the brig!' The jolly-boat being lowered and manned, I was ordered into her; and was attended by Mr. Moulds, the Second Lieutenant, and Mr. Simmons, a midshipman. When I reached the rock, the Lieutenant first went on shore, and was followed by his brother-officer; I being called forward, quitted the boat.
The rock was rugged and sharp; and, being without shoes and stocking, my feet were cut, and they bled very much! I asked the Lieutenant for a pair of shoes; which he procured from one of the boat's crew, on the promise of giving him more when he went on board. Another gave me a knife, and each officer gave me a handkerchief. I asked the Lieutenant, 'In the name of God, Sir, what am I to do?' He replied, taking me by the hand, with tears of compassion, 'Keep a sharp look-out for ships that pass!' He, then quitted the rock, leaving me in the greatest despair, with hands clasped and tears running down my cheeks, standing as if fixed to to [sic] the rock, watching the boat till it approached the brig, which was soon lost to my view by the darkness of the night.
First night - I then, with trembling steps, took a view of my unfortunate situation, threw myself down full of grief, and remaining in that state the greatest part of the night.
First day - Day coming on, I saw, as I supposed, the brig bearing towards the rock; but soon was aware she took another course. I then traversed the rock, in hopes of seeing some other ship pass; but those I saw were at too great a distance for me to hail them. Being greatly exhausted, and my lips parched with the excessive heat of a West Indian sun, I was obliged to drink of the salt water, which was the only nourishment I was able to find. I then threw myself down on my bed of flint, and endeavoured to take some repose; but sleep was not left for me.
Second night. - Night coming on, I became more resigned to my unhappy fate, being in hopes that Providence would release me the next day; and, with little or no sleep, prayer was my only recourse.
Second day - At the dawn of this day, I went out in search of food; but could not find any, not even a blade of grass, a weed, or a limpet. It has been reported that I had limpets; but this is without foundation: every body who has seen the rock well knows that there are none there, nor any other article which could possibly be converted into food. Hunger became violent; but there was no other recourse but salt war, which made me worse.
Third night - Part of the third night I spent in prayers, and at day-break of the
Third day - I again traversed the rock in search of food, and found an egg: but could not eat it, as it was in a very putrid state; it being out of season for birds to lay. It rained on this day, which enabled me to get a little fresh water. - Hunger became more violent, and rendered me restless the whole of this day; and during the
Fourth night - My distress no tongue can describe!
Fourth day - I wandered about, searching every crevice of the rock - saw a small piece of the bark of a tree, about the size of a man's hand, which had been washed on the rock by the sea. I looked at it as if astonished at the great blessing, took it up, and eat it, as if it had been the greatest luxury; notwithstanding the sun had dried up all its moisture, still it, in some measure, satisfied nature, and hunger now, for a time, left me.
Fifth night - Night drawing on, I again laid me down to sleep: but was continually alarmed by what had troubled me before, black lizards crawling over my face, and being ignorant of the harmlessness of those creatures. I remained restless the whole of that night.
Fifth day - Thirst became more violent than before. I now found the value of my shipmate's last gift, which was the knife before-mentioned. With this I cut the quills from the feathers which were shed from the sea-birds (some of which are called boobies,) which visit the rock, and by the assistance of these, I was enabled to suck the rain water from the crevices, which was not to be got out any other way.
Sixth night. - The refreshment I got from the rain enabled me to take some little repose.
Sixth day. - I was refreshed by more showers of rain, and supplied with a little more fresh water. I saw two vessels pass at a great distance.
Seventh night. - On this night the heavens were as light as noon-day, arising from a continuation of strong flashes of lightning, which were followed by violent claps of thunder! The awfulness of this night was beyond description. Think what must have been my feelings, to be without food, without clothing, and even without a human being to sympathize with me in my sufferings. I gave myself up to despair, and earnestly prayed God to release me from my misery!
Seventh day. - On this day, in the morning, a ship hove in sight, which gave me fresh hopes, but they were soon banished by her steering another course, when she soon disappeared. I found myself now more forlorn, more miserable, and more hopeless than ever. Overcome with weakness, and being nearly exhausted, I became more resigned to my fate, and ended the lingering day in prayers!
Eighth night. - Heavy dews and very cold, but no hole nor cavern to creep into; yet on the
Eighth day - The rock was so hot by the heat of the sun, that it was almost insupportable. I stripped myself of my jacket and trowsers, and bathed myself in the puddles of salt water which lodged in parts of the rock, and which was thrown there by sprays of the sea. This I had done before, and it relieved me much, and I laid me down and had some repose.
Nineth night - Was not so cold as some of the preceding nights, which enabled me to sleep the greater part of it - Providence must have ordained it, to enable my strength to support me in the exertions I used in hailing the schooner Adams, Captain John Dennis, from Martinique, bound for Marblehead in America. This was the welcome vessel, that on the nineth day, at half-past two in the afternoon, release me from my sufferings."

Vessels ENTERED and CLEARED.

ENTERED.
Oct. 5. Sch. Gov. Bentinck, M'Kenzie, from Oronoque.
10. Snow Henry, M'Dowal, Newfoundland.
11. Sch. Phoenix, Norburn, Barbados.
14. Ship Mary, Laughton, Liverpool.
Ship Louisa, Gray, Greenock.
15. Brig Mariner, M'Intosh, Portsmouth, N.A.
16. Ship John, Tyer, Liverpool.

CLEARED.
Oct. 8. Brig Susan, Salter, for Portsmouth, N.A.
Sloop Mary, Briggs, Barbados.
16. Schr. Phoenix, Norburn, Barbados.

FOR LIVERPOOL.
THE SHIP
ANTIGUA PACKET,
J. MARES, Master,
Is intended to sail in all November. For Freight or Passage apply to Capt. Mares, or
Oct. 19th. CHORLEY and COOK.

FOR LIVERPOOL.
THE SHIP
JOHN,
D. TYRER, Master,
To sail the first springs in December. For Freight or Passage apply to the Master on board, or to
Oct. 19th. M'INROY, SANDBACH, and Co.

FOR LONDON.
THE COPPERED SHIP
GENERAL MIRANDA,
T. SILTH, Master,
Well armed and manned,
Will sail the 12th of January, or as soon after as the tides will permit. For Freight or Passage apply to the said Master or
Oct. 19th. WARDROP and FERGUSON.

LIST of Runaway and Arrested SLAVES in the
Colony Stocks of DEMERARY, 19th October, 1811.

Names.

Proprietors

Brought by

Naamen.

Eigenaaren.

Aanberengers.

Daniel,

Pl. La Resource,

Pl. Meerzorg.

Sandy,

Marten,

Pioneers.

Willem,

Dr. Reitser,

Pl. Georgia.

Charles,

Kreekel,

Uytvlugt.

Harris,

Pl. King Donan,

Pioneers.

Frederick,

Jeffery,

Dr. Lewis.

Coffy,

Pl. Elizabeth-hall,

Juff. de Wolf

Cesar,

McKay,

Pl. Vergennoegen.

Tim,

Akyn,

Pl. Rome.

Pamelia,

Ashington,

Lelyveld.

Abraham,

Simson (Berbice)

Pl. Haarlem.

Jim,

Allen,

Buys.

Brandys,

Bennet (Berbice)

Jeffery.

Coffy,

Juff. Doresten,

Dienders.

Caesar,

Anderson,

Pl. Covent Garden,

Hollander,

Hunt,

McAulay,

S. G. MARTENS, Drossart.

STABROEK: Printed and Published
EVERY TUESDAY AND SATURDAY AFTERNOON
By Edward James Henery.
 


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